Monthly Archives: March 2013

Lawn Mowers

parkpro254wd_EGH3913blue--12Whether it’s demanding daily professional use, or for your garden at home, ride-on mowers deliver unmatched performance, efficiency and finish whatever the size of the task. We handle a very wide range of products from three of the top manufacturers; Kubota, Stiga and Mountfield.

Reliable Ride-on Mowers

Why those manufacturers? Well we don’t only supply the products, we also support them and we know that these manufacturers produce the most reliable machines and that therefore they are the most cost effective.

Cut and Collect Mowers

The technology varies, we handle traditional cut-and-collect tractors, mulch mowers and zero turn mowers. Dependent upon your application and in some cases personal preference you will opt for the machine that you think is best for you.

Mulch or Collect?

One choice you will be confronted with is mulch versus bag. Do you want to collect and then dispose of your grass cuttings or do you invest in a mulch mower that has additional blades which produce very small cuttings that are not collected? The environmental lobby will always favour the mulch solution arguing that you are returning the nutrients and moisture in the clippings to the soil which is good for the grass. Keen gardeners worry about the possible build up of “thatch” due to the clippings being left on the lawn. This is not really a factor as grass leaves are around 90% water so they breakdown quickly. Whatever your preference you can see both types of machine in our showroom and try them out to satisfy yourself.

 

Choosing the right cleaning machine!

montageWith the vast array of cleaning machines available which one do you choose? This post attempts to give you some insight into the questions you will need to answer. Not rocket science but maybe help you prepare for your discussions with prospective suppliers. Also it might help you avoid overlooking an obvious but important point.

Dry or wet?

Dust and debris that is dry can be collected by a sweeper. Introduce water, grease or oil and the situation changes. So the first consideration is just that, will your cleaning be in a dry environment? Yes; look at sweepers. No; then you will need a scrubber drier or a combination machine.

Cleaning Result Required

If you just want to collect dust and debris and are happy with the appearance of the floor then again a sweeper will do just that. However if you want to remove marks and staining from the floor you will want the scrubbing action of a scrubber drier.

Where do you want to clean?

Working inside vs outside introduces a number of considerations. I addition to the wet vs dry situations we have already considered there is the machine’s motor – if its not electric it will produce fumes. Is this acceptable? If not electric power is a your only way to go. When looking at the sweeper’s power requirement look for synergy with the forklifts you might have on site already. Do you have LPG powered forklifts or red diesel on site for tractors then could your sweeper’s motor take advantage of these resources?

Size of the problem

This is a trade off. Cleaning machines have a theoretical cleaning capacity, this is derived from the machine’s cleaning width and its working speed. So, if you want to clean your warehouse floor you could choose a large machine that cleans it in an hour. A machine with a smaller cleaning capacity might take two hours but cost 30% less. There is your dilemma!

A walk behind sweeper can clean a large car park. But, the time it takes when you consider the speed at which it can operate, the number of trips to empty the hopper and that the operator might be exhausted by the amount of walking would make it unacceptable: Then you have to figure out how much you want to pay to reduce or eliminate these factors.

So there you have it. Not exhaustive and it does not cover everything, but this might be useful as a starting point. At the end of the day talking to your suppliers engineers will be the best way to get just the right machine for your application.

Brushes as in Powered Sweepers

 

main-brushes

Powered sweepers use brushes to pick-up the dirt and debris from the floor and deposit it in the hopper. This post talks a little about the different brushes and their function.

Main Brush

The main brush sweeps dust and refuse into the bin at the rear of the motor-sweeper. Never sweep up string, wire, etc., which can become entangled in the brush and damage the bristles. Periodically check the condition of the brush. The main brush rotates against the direction of travel of the motor-sweeper and throws the dirt and debris over itself into the rear hopper on motor-sweepers having an up-and-over sweeping system.

Adjusting the main brush

The main brush should just touch the floor. While the motor-sweeper is stationary on an even floor the section of floor covered by the bristles should be 3 cm wide. If the main brush no longer touches the floor, or leaves lines of dirt, it has worn down and must be lowered. Once beyond the limit of adjustment the main brush should be replaced, a simple procedure on our sweepers.

Side brush

The side brush sweeps dirt from the edges of floors and from corners, and directs it to the centre of the sweeper where it can be picked up by the main brush. Looking from the operator’s position, the left hand side brush turns clockwise, the right hand side brush turns counter clockwise. On large machines the side brushes can oscillate so that when they meet an obstruction they will swing out of the way. Up to three side brushes can be fitted to extend the sweeping width of a machine.

Adjusting the side brush

Check that the shape of the trace left by the side brush is circular. As the bristles of the side brush wear down, adjust the height of the brush from the floor.  When the motor-sweeper is not in use, the side brush must always be raised above the ground, to prevent its bristles from becoming bent.