Choosing the right cleaning machine!

montageWith the vast array of cleaning machines available which one do you choose? This post attempts to give you some insight into the questions you will need to answer. Not rocket science but maybe help you prepare for your discussions with prospective suppliers. Also it might help you avoid overlooking an obvious but important point.

Dry or wet?

Dust and debris that is dry can be collected by a sweeper. Introduce water, grease or oil and the situation changes. So the first consideration is just that, will your cleaning be in a dry environment? Yes; look at sweepers. No; then you will need a scrubber drier or a combination machine.

Cleaning Result Required

If you just want to collect dust and debris and are happy with the appearance of the floor then again a sweeper will do just that. However if you want to remove marks and staining from the floor you will want the scrubbing action of a scrubber drier.

Where do you want to clean?

Working inside vs outside introduces a number of considerations. I addition to the wet vs dry situations we have already considered there is the machine’s motor – if its not electric it will produce fumes. Is this acceptable? If not electric power is a your only way to go. When looking at the sweeper’s power requirement look for synergy with the forklifts you might have on site already. Do you have LPG powered forklifts or red diesel on site for tractors then could your sweeper’s motor take advantage of these resources?

Size of the problem

This is a trade off. Cleaning machines have a theoretical cleaning capacity, this is derived from the machine’s cleaning width and its working speed. So, if you want to clean your warehouse floor you could choose a large machine that cleans it in an hour. A machine with a smaller cleaning capacity might take two hours but cost 30% less. There is your dilemma!

A walk behind sweeper can clean a large car park. But, the time it takes when you consider the speed at which it can operate, the number of trips to empty the hopper and that the operator might be exhausted by the amount of walking would make it unacceptable: Then you have to figure out how much you want to pay to reduce or eliminate these factors.

So there you have it. Not exhaustive and it does not cover everything, but this might be useful as a starting point. At the end of the day talking to your suppliers engineers will be the best way to get just the right machine for your application.